Journey of Three - Katherine Martinez

Katherine and her classmates, April (L) and Yumiko (R), are ready for the EDI session!

Katherine and her classmates, April (L) and Yumiko (R), are ready for the EDI session!

The ability to give and receive feedback is not easy to master, regardless of the environment. Giving your mom feedback about how her beef noodle soup could have used a bit more salt is just as challenging as giving your boss feedback in regards to how he handled himself during a review meeting. While most understand how powerful the impact of feedback is in the workplace, the comfort level in approaching and delivering feedback can deter even the most confident and outspoken individuals.

During our most recent session titled "Powerful Feedback", Anh Vo gave an useful perspective on how to give and handle feedback. I distinctly remember getting feedback that left me confused. “Why did she just tell me that?” “What did he really mean?” “Oh I get it, she doesn’t like me.” These are just a few of the thoughts I've had when approached with feedback from others with little to no structure on the specific feedback. Getting feedback like that can be very frustrating and leave an overall negative impression. I appreciated Anh going over the types of feedback: Evaluative, Interpretive, Supportive, Probing and Understanding. That was when the light bulb went off in my head that feedback is not criticism! Asking for feedback can put a lot of pressure on people as they don’t feel it is appropriate to criticize others, however that isn’t what the intent of feedback is! The intent and impact of feedback is to motivate, enhance morale, increase performance, and produce better results.

The group was given the opportunity to practice how to give and receive feedback during our afternoon session through role-playing specific workplace scenarios. I felt the role-playing really helped myself and others become more comfortable about how to read and understand a situation before addressing the feedback that is needed. Anh really stressed the importance of giving feedback to be behaviorally specific, be aware of the impact, make the intentions clear and ask for what you want and need. It was very interesting for the group to practice both sides, it really brought perspective.

I appreciated the fact that the more effective you are at giving feedback, the better it will be received. Knowing that really helps me want to be more open to giving feedback to others besides my peers and manager. At work, my leadership is often looking for feedback and doesn’t usually receive it directly from the source. It is often brought up to them from the specific individuals’ manager. After attending Anh’s session, I will work to continue on being more direct in giving feedback personally to my leadership. The value from the feedback coming from the source is extremely powerful. A person who can take time out of their day to give feedback shows their dedication for their job and those who influence it!