Alumni On The Move - November 2018

Jacob Trieu

Puget Sound Discovery, Class of 2015

Someone once told me, "Keep on doing what you've always done and you won't always get what you’ve always got." Hmm….you might be thinking 'isn't this the meaning of consistency? If repetition doesn't always yield the same results, what does? This is true if all of the given conditions are the same and continue to remain the same, but in life it seldom ever does.

This is especially true for jobs and careers. We can go to work, do our jobs, impact people's lives and go home and repeat. But there is something that changes ever so subtly if not the world around us…ourselves. And because of this nothing is ever truly consistent in life. We need something to help push us to grow, some change to drive us forward.

I recently moved into a Senior Project Manager role at Omron Microscan working on products for industrial automation and verification. Previously at Boeing, I was working as a Senior Project Engineer on aircraft interiors. You might be asking, why change jobs, industry or even career? Each day I would work on cool products that the flying public touches and gets to see, I would collaborate with aviation enthusiasts around the world, and yet there was something more I yearned for. As I reflected internally, I realized I needed to grow in a way that pushed me in ways I can’t think of. All so I can strive to be better than I was yesterday.

My new role at Omron has challenged me every day to learn about new products, finding ways to lead and motivate teams, and provides me new perspectives on how to think and act differently. This environment change I made externally began with the transitioning I began internally. The saying goes, "Change is external, transition is internal."

EDI has had a major impact on where I am and will continue to be a part of my future. EDI has challenged me to take more dynamic risks for a better future. So now I am throwing down a challenge to all of you out there…Challenge yourself today to commit to following through for a better tomorrow.


Anna Kim

Puget Sound Discovery, Class of 2018

In my EDI class, one of the most important lessons I learned was to package my life experience as a whole and use it as a strength by presenting my authentic best. Professionally, I was always holding back, suspicious that I might reveal weakness. In EDI I learned that I was going about this the wrong way. There may be vulnerabilities, but also my greatest source of strength.

Throughout the EDI class I took the opportunity to consider not who I am, but why. This journey helped me immensely when I decided to move back to Oregon. I took a job with the Public Utility Commission of Oregon as the energy efficiency specialist. I administer the Energy Trust grant, draft administrative rules, and review utility resource investments.

Anna Kim (center) presents to the Commission while accompanied by her lawyer as her manager observes from the audience.

Puget Sound Discovery, Class of 2018

In this role, I felt I could use the full breadth of my skills. Here, I use my analytic mind to understand the overarching impacts of decisions, I use poetry to construct my arguments, and I found a place that deserves my loyalty. All of that communication and presentation training sure

helps in this line of work too.

To be honest, this job demands my authentic best. I can’t imagine going back.

You’ll find me outdoors more often than not, enjoying my Oregonian days.

Anna Kim, Korean American. Economist. Poet.